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Monday, November 2, 2020 | History

7 edition of Arguing the modern Jewish canon found in the catalog.

Arguing the modern Jewish canon

essays on literature and culture in honor of Ruth R. Wisse

by

  • 305 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Jewish literature -- History and criticism,
  • Literature, Modern -- Jewish authors -- History and criticism,
  • Hebrew literature -- History and criticism,
  • Hebrew language,
  • Yiddish language,
  • Judaism and literature,
  • Canon (Literature),
  • Jews in literature

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Justin Cammy... [et al.].
    ContributionsCammy, Justin Daniel., Wisse, Ruth R.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPN842 .A74 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19887087M
    ISBN 109780674025851
    LC Control Number2007047941


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Arguing the modern Jewish canon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Arguing the Modern Jewish Canon brings together writers both seasoned and young, from both within and beyond the academy, to reflect the diversity of Wisse's areas of expertise and reading : Hardcover.

Arguing the Modern Jewish Canon brings together writers both seasoned and young, from both within and beyond the academy, to reflect the diversity of Wisse’s areas of expertise and reading audiences.

Over the past four decades Ruth R. Wisse has been a leading scholar of Yiddish and Jewish literary studies in North America, and one of our most fearless public intellectuals on issues relating to Jewish society, culture, and politics.

In this celebratory volume, edited by four of her former Price: $   Inspired by her award-winning book, "The Modern Jewish Canon", Wisse's fellow scholars take up many questions raised by her definition of Jewish canonicity, while offering new readings of such disparate writers as George Eliot, Isaac Babel, J.

Salinger, S. Agnon, Philip Roth, and many others. Edited with Justin Cammy, Dara Horn and Rachel Rubinstein. Ruth R. Wisse eloquently fields these questions in The Modern Jewish Canon, her compassionate, insightful guide to the finest Jewish literature of the twentieth century. From Isaac Babel to Isaac Bashevis Singer, Elie Wiesel to Cynthia Ozick, Wisse's The Modern Jewish Canon is a book that every student of Jewish literature, and every reader of Reviews: 8.

Arguing the Modern Jewish Canon brings together writers both seasoned and young, from both within and beyond the academy, to reflect the diversity of Wisse's areas of expertise and reading audiences. The modern Jewish canon Wisse proposes comprises those books that convey an experience of Jewish actuality, those in which "the authors or characters know and let the reader know that they are.

Biblical literature - Biblical literature - Old Testament canon, texts, and versions: The term canon, from a Hebrew-Greek word meaning “cane” or “measuring rod,” passed into Christian usage to mean “norm” or “rule of faith.” The Church Fathers of the 4th century ce first employed it in reference to the definitive, authoritative nature of the body of sacred Scripture.

Rabbinic Judaism recognizes the 24 books of the Masoretic Text, commonly called the Tanakh or Hebrew Bible, as authoritative. Modern scholarship suggests that the most recently written are the books of Jonah, Lamentations, and Daniel, all of which may have been composed as late as the second century BCE.

[citation needed] Rabbinic sources hold that the biblical canon was closed after the end. The Hebrew canon contains 24 books, one for each of the scrolls on which these works were written in ancient times. The Hebrew Bible is organized into three main sections: the Torah, or “Teaching,” also called the Pentateuch or the “Five Books of Moses”; the Neviʾim, or Prophets; and the Ketuvim, or is often referred to as the Tanakh, a word combining the first letter from.

Arguing the modern Jewish canon: essays on literature and culture in honor of Ruth R. Wisse. R Wisse is a scholar of Yiddish and Jewish literary studies and one of our public intellectuals on issues relating to Jewish society and culture.

This book pays tribute to her with a collection Read more Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with. It is unlikely in the near future that the canon will be further altered, however, due to four reasons: (1) the inertia of mass-produced texts (2) their general acceptance in modern day Christianity, (3) the rise of literalist readings of the Bible appearing in Harvard Seminary in the late nineteenth-century, and (4) the publication in America.

Arguing the Modern Jewish Canon: Essays on Literature and Culture in Honor of Ruth R. Arguing the modern Jewish canon book : David Aberbach, Monika Adamczyk-Garbowska, Edward Alexander. Early Christian citations of the 22 Book Jewish Canon Melito AD, cited in Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History, ; Origen AD; Hilary of Poitiers AD, Tractate on Psalms, Prologue 15; Athanasius AD, Letter ; Cyril of Jerusalem, AD, Catechetical Lectures 2, ; Council of Laodicea AD, Canon 60; Gregory of Nazianzus AD, Carmina, The 24 Books of Judaism are equivalent to the 39 Books common to all Christian Old Testaments, for Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, and Ezra-Nehemiah were each divided into two parts in the Christian canons, and the one Book of the Twelve Prophets was split into twelve books, one for each prophet.

The above table lists the Book of Daniel with the Prophets, as found in the Dead Sea Scrolls, instead.

*There are several branches of the Eastern Orthodox tradition that have minor differences in their canons of Scripture. 1 In the Greek tradition (the Septuagint and some modern traditions that follow the Eastern church tradition), 1 and 2 Samuel are combined with the books of Kings, known as Kings or most Protestant canons of the Western Church, the books are known as What makes a great Jewish book.

What makes a book "Jewish" in the first place. Ruth R. Wisse, one of the leading scholars in the field of Jewish literature, sets out to answer these questions in The Modern Jewish Modern Jewish Canon.

The modern Jewish canon Wisse proposes comprises those books that convey an experience of Jewish actuality, those in which "the authors or characters know and let the reader know that they are Jews," for better or worse.

The Jewish canon was not directed from above but developed from the "bottom-up." Ancient Jews did not have a council in the way that the Christian did, and while the Temple in Jerusalem kept some scrolls, it did not do so to prescribe the books of the canon.

A canon is a list of books considered an authority by a group of people, a list to which no more books may be added and from which none may be subtracted. The list is fixed. The most famous canon is the list of books that make up the Bible. In the case of the Jewish Bible, the canon contains 22 books.

The modern Jewish canon Wisse proposes comprises those books that convey an experience of Jewish actuality, those in which "the authors. By sharing the book rabbinic canon, modern Jews share a fundamental Jewish identity.

We still argue — but about their interpretation, not about what is considered authoritative. Abraham Berkovitz is a historian of Judaism and an assistant professor of liturgy at Hebrew Union College — Jewish.

The Greek word canon (originally a straight rod or pole, measuring-rod, then rule) denotes that collection of books which the churches receive as given by inspiration of God, and therefore as constituting for them a divine rule of faith and the books included in it the term canonical is applied.

The Canon of the Old Testament, considered in reference to its constituent parts. "Lim is a confident guide through the sources and the debates regarding the formation of the Jewish canon.

In this essential and readable book, he deftly explores the problems of interpretation and recovery, cogently arguing for a persuasive yet nuanced position of. What makes a great Jewish book. In fact, what makes a book "Jewish" in the first place. Ruth R. Wisse eloquently fields these questions in The Modern Jewish Canon, her compassionate, insightful guide to the finest Jewish literature of the twentieth Isaac Babel to Isaac Bashevis Singer, Elie Wiesel to Cynthia Ozick, Wisse’s The Modern Jewish Canon is a book that every student of.

Ruth R. Wisse eloquently fields these questions in The Modern Jewish Canon, her compassionate, insightful guide to the finest Jewish literature of the twentieth century.

From Isaac Babel to Isaac Bashevis Singer, Elie Wiesel to Cynthia Ozick, Wisse's The Modern Jewish Canon is a book that every student of Jewish literature, and every reader of Reviews: 7. Schwartz begins by arguing that the distinctiveness of Judaism in the Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman periods was the product of generally prevailing imperial tolerance.

From around 70 C.E. to the mid-fourth century, with failed revolts and the alluring cultural norms of the High Roman Empire, Judaism all but disintegrated. Wisse's book is devoted to mapping the contours of Jewish national literature in the modern period.

The contention at the heart of her passionate and scholarly new book is her insistence not only that a definable modern Jewish literary canon exists, but that it embodies the history, politics and culture of modern. This volume opens the canon of modern Jewish thought to the all too often overlooked writings of Jews from the Arab East, from the close of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth.

Whether they identified as Sephardim, Mizrahim, anticolonialists, or Zionists, these thinkers engaged the challenges and transformations of Middle.

in the 16th century. Generally, for the Old Testament books the Christian tradition simply accepted the Jewish collection of books that were considered authoritative by their use in the community.

However, since the Jewish canon was not officially set, some books were in use within Judaism that had not yet reached the status of being authoritative. A biblical canon or canon of scripture is a set of texts (or "books") which a particular religious community regards as authoritative English word "canon" comes from the Greek κανών, meaning "rule" or "measuring stick".Christians were the first to use the term in reference to scripture, but Eugene Ulrich regards the notion as Jewish.

The book of Hebrews was quoted in 95 A.D. by Clement of Rome, indicating that the book was written prior to that year. Hebrews speaks of the Temple in Jerusalem as an existing edifice. If it had already been destroyed, the author would have referred to that fact as an example of the less authoritative nature of the Judaic system.

Martin Luther was not afraid to challenge the canon of Scripture. He relegated four New Testament books to an appendix, denying that they were divinely inspired.

Though this alteration of the New Testament wasn’t adopted by the Protestant movements, his alteration of the Old Testament was, and by the end of the Reformation Protestantism had removed seven books (the deuterocanonicals).

Edmon L. Gallagher on Timothy H. Lim’s The Formation of the Jewish Canon Timothy H. Lim, The Formation of the Jewish Canon, Yale University Press,pp., $45 We don’t know where the Bible came from. It took shape over a period of centuries, and rarely can we do more than take educated guesses about the context in which the individual books achieved their final form or entered.

Search the full text of our books in Yiddish at our Full-Text Book Search Site. Programs on Yiddish literature and culture recorded at Montreal's Jewish Public Library, The Modern Jewish Canon Ruth Wisse. Listen now: previous play pause stop next.

mute recorded at the Jewish Public Library of. The Book of Jonah stands unique in the prophetical canon, in that it does not contain any predictions, but simply relates the story of its hero, beginning for that reason with "wa-yeḥi," like a passage taken from history.

The contents may be summarized as follows: Ch. i.: Jonah is commanded by Yhwh to prophesy against Nineveh. The Jewish national sport is arguing. The rules to the sport are pretty slim: within a specific range, almost any opinion can be raised.

One might read the story of Polemo and conclude that in Judaism there are a few topics about which you can’t ask questions. The Modern Jewish Canon: A Journey Through Language and Culture Ruth R.

Wisse, Author Free Press $28 (p) ISBN More By and About This Author. The word canon originally meant a measuring rod or standard of measure.

It was applied to the Old Testament as Jewish leaders determined which books should or should not be viewed as Scripture. According to the Jewish historian Josephus, the thirty-nine books of the Old Testament were brought together during the life of Ezra (Neh. Wisse (If I Am Not for Myself, ) seeks to define a modern canon of works—in Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, German, Polish, Italian, and English—through which Jews have expressed their sense of who they are and what they have come to be in the years since the monopoly of their sacred literature was broken during the phrase “Jewish canon” immediately suggests Torah in.Canon Argument Because Daniel appears in the LXX and was considered part of the Jewish Canon, some have argued that a late dating does not allow enough time for full acceptance into that canon.

In contrast, the Books of the Maccabees, which were written around that time, only appear in some of the Septuagint manuscripts - evidence that there.A sought-after lecturer on the international stage for both Jewish and non-Jewish audiences, Rabbi Cardozo is the author of 13 books and numerous articles in both English and Hebrew.